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Antioxidant Do Not Benefit Alzheimer's Patients


Antioxidant Do Not Benefit Alzheimer's Patients

(ePharmaNews) A new American study has challenged the common concept that antioxidants fight Alzheimer's. Moreover, the current study proved that antioxidant can even speed up mental decline.

The new study finds that a "cocktail" of vitamins E, vitamin C and alpha-lipoic acid has no effect on certain indicators of the brain disorder.
"The benefit on oxidative stress in the brain was small and is of unclear significance," said lead researcher Dr. Douglas Galasko, a professor in residence in the department of neurosciences at the University of California, San Diego.

Patients did not show cognitive improvement in this short-term study; in fact, there was a slight worsening on one test of cognition in patients who received the antioxidant combination," Galasko said.

Aging causes oxidative damage in the brain, which is extensive in people with Alzheimer's disease. Clinical trials looking at whether a diet rich in antioxidants could reduce that risk have had mixed results, the researchers said.

This study does not support using any of these antioxidants once a diagnosis is made of established Alzheimer's disease, Galasko said. "If antioxidants continue to be tested against Alzheimer's disease, newer approaches or drugs may be needed," he said.

This study, published in the March 19 online edition of the Archives of Neurology, does not address whether taking antioxidants could help to prevent Alzheimer's disease, he noted. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia among older people.

For the study, Galasko's team gave antioxidant supplements to 78 patients with Alzheimer's disease who were part of a study funded by the U.S. National Institute on Aging. The patients were placed into three groups. One group received daily doses of vitamin E, vitamin C and alpha-lipoic acid. A second group was given coenzyme Q (a compound made naturally in the body to protect cells from damage) three times a day. The third group received a placebo. After 16 weeks, 66 patients had their cerebrospinal fluid analyzed.

Among the three groups, the researchers found no difference in markers related to Alzheimer's disease in the cerebrospinal fluid. These markers included the amyloid-beta protein and the proteins tau and P-tau.


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Prepared by: Mohammed Kanjo


Source :

ePharmaNews






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