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Less Support For Depressed Patients


Less Support For Depressed Patients

(ePharmaNews) - Many people tend to blame persons with psychological disturbances and ask them not to act as "patients", even though they are actually identified by specialists as patients. This phenomenon is addressed in a recent study, researchers found that patients of depression and common mental illnesses do not receive adequate support.

This new study, was released in a recent issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behaviors, showed that as definitions of mental illnesses broadens, people who show signs of depression and other common mental illnesses are less likely to evoke a supportive response from friends and family members, unlike people with other severe mental disorders.

The researcher conducted interviews with 165 individuals with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depression, and other less severe disorders, who were undergoing mental health treatment for the first time. They found that those with more common and socially-accepted mental illnesses, such as depression and mild mood disorders, did not receive strong reactions to their conditions from family members, friends, or others. Brea stated that as a result, their support networks may be less willing to take on caregiver's responsibilities or to excuse them when their behavior deviates from what is considered normal.

One of the researchers wrote, "Perhaps because so many people are diagnosed and subsequently treated successfully, signs of depression do not alarm friends and family members to the same degree as disorders known to severely affect functioning."

Thes study also found that diagnosing someone with a severe mental illness that is more outwardly recognizable such as schizophrenia and the manic phase of bipolar disorder can lead to a higher amount of rejection and discrimination by acquaintances and strangers while at the same time creating a stronger social support system among close friends and family.
 
Specialists warn that the lack of emotional daily support may harm those patients. "Day-to-day emotional and instrumental support is likely to play a critical role in recovery from mental illness." They concluded.
 


اضغط هنا للقراءة باللغة العربية

Prepared by: Marcell Shehwaro
Translated by: Marcell Shehwaro


Source :

ePharmaNews






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