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Keep Moving to Prevent Alzheimer’s


Keep Moving to Prevent Alzheimer’s

(ePharmaNews) - Mental sports like chess, cross words and Sudoku are essential to prevent Alzheimer’s disease after retirement, but a new American study shows that daily physical activity is never less important even among those who are over 80.

This study, which was published in the April 18, 2012, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, suggests that old people who were the least active were more than twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease as compared to the most active old people.


“The study showed that not only exercise but also activities such as cooking, washing the dishes and cleaning are associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease,” said study author Aron S. Buchman, MD, with Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. “These results provide support for efforts to encourage physical activity in even very old people who might not be able to participate in formal exercise but can still benefit from a more active lifestyle.”


For the study, a group of 716 people with an average age of 82 wore an actigraph, a device that monitors activity, on their non-dominant wrist continuously for 10 days. All exercise and non-exercise was recorded. They also were given annual tests during the four-year study that measured memory and thinking abilities. During the study, 71 people developed Alzheimer’s disease.
 
Participants also self-reported their physical and social activity. Buchman said this is the first study to use an objective measurement of physical activity in addition to self-reporting. “This is important because people may not be able to remember the details correctly,” he said.


“Since the actigraph was attached to the wrist, activities like cooking, washing the dishes, playing cards and even moving a wheelchair with a person’s arms were associated with a lower Alzheimer’s risk,” said Michal Schnaider-Beeri, PhD, of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York in an accompanying editorial. “These are low-cost, easily accessible and side-effect free activities people can do at any age, including very old age, to possibly prevent Alzheimer’s disease.”


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Prepared by: Laila Nour


Source :

ePharmaNews






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