Home
My Account
About Us
Forum
Contact us
الواجهة العربية
epharmaweb.com
Medical News Medical News
Aricles Articles
Events Events
Guidelines Guidelines
Videos Library Videos Library
Diseases Diseases
Follow us : facebook twitter Digg Linkedin Boxiz
Newsletter

Please select the categories you are intersted in:
News Articles Guidelines Events Videos Journals' abstracts

Latest Subscribers
Advanced Search »



Secondhand Smokers Prone to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes


Secondhand Smokers Prone to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes

(epharmanews)- People who are exposed to smoking but are not smokers themselves (i.e. secondhand smokers) are more likely to be obese and to develop diabetes, according to a new study that was presented last Sunday at The Endocrine Society’s 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.

“More effort needs to be made to reduce exposure of individuals to secondhand smoke,” said study co-author Theodore C. Friedman, MD, PhD, chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine at Charles R. Drew University, Los Angeles.

Researchers used serum cotinine levels to verify passive smoking. Cotinine is a metabolite of nicotine, and serum cotinine measures a person’s exposure to tobacco smoke. They examined data from more than 6,300 adults who participated from 2001 to 2006 in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population.

Nearly 25 percent of the participants were smokers; one third of the participants were secondhand smokers, and about 40 percent did not smoke and were not exposed to smoke.

After analysis, secondhand smokers had a higher measure of insulin resistance, compared to nonsmokers, a condition that can lead to Type 2 diabetes; higher levels of fasting blood glucose, or blood sugar; and a higher hemoglobin A1c, a measure of blood sugar control over the past three months.

According to Dr. Friedman, secondhand smokers also had a higher rate of Type 2 diabetes, and had a similar rate of diabetes to that of current smokers.

Secondhand smokers also had a higher body mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat, compared with nonsmokers, Friedman reported. Current smokers had a lower BMI than nonsmokers but a higher hemoglobin A1c. When the researchers controlled for BMI, they found that secondhand smokers and current smokers still had a higher hemoglobin A1c than did nonsmokers.

“This finding shows that the association between secondhand smoke and Type 2 diabetes was not due to obesity,” Friedman said. “More studies are needed to show whether secondhand smoke is a cause of diabetes.”


اضغط هنا للقراءة باللغة العربية

Prepared by: Basel AlJunaidy


Source :

ePharmaNews






Other Comments

Add a comment

You must sign in to use this servcie

Username:
Password:


facebook comments

Forgot your password


sign up

Consultants Corner

Samir Moussa M.D.

Samir Moussa M.D. ENT Specialist

Dr. Talal Sabouni

Dr. Talal Sabouni UROLOGY AND KIDNEY TRANSPLANT

Dr. Tahsin Martini

Dr. Tahsin Martini Degree status: M.D. in Ophthalmology

Dr. Hani Najjar

Dr. Hani Najjar Pediatrics, Neurology

Dr. Faisal Dibsi

Dr. Faisal Dibsi Specialist of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

Yaser Habrawi , F.R.C.S.Ed

Yaser Habrawi , F.R.C.S.Ed Consultant Ophthalmologist

Dr. Samer Al-Jneidy

Dr. Samer Al-Jneidy Pediatrician

Dr . Dirar Abboud

Dr . Dirar Abboud Hepatologist – Gastroenterologist
Poll

Which of the following you are mostly interested in?

Cancer Research
Mental Health
Heart Disease & Diabetes
Sexual Health
Obesity and Healthy Diets
Mother & Child Health

Disclaimer : This site does not endorse or recommend any medical treatment, pharmaceuticals or brand names. More Details